Studies have shown that the three percent of teens diagnosed with learning disabilities such as attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, and other learning challenges, struggle so much in high school that they give up hope of ever going to college.[1]

But there is more than hope for these students. More and more colleges and universities are offering up programs for students with learning differences. But how do you go about finding the right college that will fit you/your child’s needs? Even the best student has to contend with trying to figure out which college to go to, which school will be the best fit for them. If you have a learning disability you want to make sure the schools you’re looking at offer programs and classes that will let you make the most of your college career.

jordan-jill-bursteinMeet Jordan and Jill Burstein, a mother and son team that head up JJB Educational Consulting, Inc. in Northbrook. JJB helps to serve the needs of students with learning differences by assisting students and their families in finding the best school that matches their needs. Both Jordan and Jill have personal experience in this area and will be at the Library on Thursday, October 27 at 7:00 p.m. discussing how to meet the challenges of finding a good college fit for students with learning differences, and answering your questions. Register now!

Jill has worked for over thirty years around the North Shore in the field of special education and has a Master’s in Special Education with a concentration in learning disabilities, behavior disorders, and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Working at the university level, Jill found that many of her students were transfers from other colleges that did not offer them the level of support they needed. As Jill began to investigate colleges for Jordan, who has learning disabilities, she realized that the information she gathered could be shared with others.

Jordan attended Deerfield High School, Landmark College, and Roosevelt University. He has a varied background, first working as a mental health specialist and then as an academic mentor for college students at risk, including those with learning differences, autism spectrum disorders, and ADHD. In both his personal and professional life, Jordan has visited many boarding schools and colleges to find the best fit for students with learning differences. Visits such as these help to provide Jordan an understanding of the various programs colleges offer and allow him to find the best fit for the student.

So come hear from Jill and Jordan themselves on Thursday, October 27 as they discuss what to look for in a college to meet the needs of your student with learning differences.


[1] Clark, Kim. (2010, December). 8 steps for learning disabled students who want to go to college. U.S. News. Retrieved from URL